Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 02/18/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 like
    The old timers did dig there but not to much depth. Maybe 4 or 5 feet. Little "pickers" in their tailings. 4 or 5 grains. I'm thinking they did not go deep enough. Where they did put their adit was in a strange location.... not related to the intersection and no signs of gold in their tailings. They were in bluestone and the area of the intersection has some igneous material.
  2. 1 like
    A series of mud slides seems plausible. That would allow for some settling and deposition of silt/muck layers between events.
  3. 1 like
    Not an awful lot to report. I'm about 9' in my drift which is about 5' wide and 5' 6" high at the top of an arch. My gravel is very atypical with large lenses of pure muck in between a jumble of chunky, fine and ground up shist bedrock, large cobbles, angular and rounded quartz and a smattering of intrusives. There's no bedding or layering except for the muck and I even have bones almost to bed rock, one of those being a young mammoth jaw complete with two teeth found 2' off bed rock. It's quite a conundrum. And the gold is not primarily just off bed rock but spotty and scattered throughout the entire column. Got any ideas? Heavy flood event?? I'm also continually making changes to my heat rods for the gravel thawing. My latest iteration should be ready to test out in about 2 weeks. From calculations and prior experience I'm expecting some really effective thawing. I'm also improving my drilling system making it faster and less labor intensive. My bucket hoist has been working nearly flawlessly. I'm ready for the cold to leave though I'm not looking forward to fighting with runoff again this year. Got some ideas how to mitigate it. More soon. Thannks all for your continued interest.
  4. 1 like
    Here is a bit of gold I have got on a couple recent trips to the northern Nevada goldfields - Been a really wet last 6 weeks or so up this way with thundershowers and lightning on many days. The total weight for this gold is about ten grams, or roughly 1/3rd of an ounce. The bigger pieces were found with Minelab's GPZ 7000, while the smaller stuff, mostly to the right side of the photo, was taken with their SDC 2300 - both very definitely have their place for the types of detecting I do. I've had rain shortened days prospecting where I had to sit in my car and wait out a storm, etc. and some partial days that were spent with some time prospecting but some time driving back and forth to the gold fields and later returning home. I'd say this gold represents the equivalent of about 5 full days of prospecting. I wish I could claim the biggest piece was some faint warble of a signal that I had the talent and skills to hear and identify, but it was a loud booming target less than an inch deep that any metal detector could have heard. When it boomed through my earphones I was sure it was trash, but I dug it and in much of northern Nevada there is not a lot of trash. The second swing of my pick a dirt clod flipped over and the big nugget was shining back at me. That was a nice feeling! Good gold is still out there, it just takes some work, persistence and a bit of luck - and sometimes you need some patience while waiting for the thunderstorms to stop.