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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/14/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Not an awful lot to report. I'm about 9' in my drift which is about 5' wide and 5' 6" high at the top of an arch. My gravel is very atypical with large lenses of pure muck in between a jumble of chunky, fine and ground up shist bedrock, large cobbles, angular and rounded quartz and a smattering of intrusives. There's no bedding or layering except for the muck and I even have bones almost to bed rock, one of those being a young mammoth jaw complete with two teeth found 2' off bed rock. It's quite a conundrum. And the gold is not primarily just off bed rock but spotty and scattered throughout the entire column. Got any ideas? Heavy flood event?? I'm also continually making changes to my heat rods for the gravel thawing. My latest iteration should be ready to test out in about 2 weeks. From calculations and prior experience I'm expecting some really effective thawing. I'm also improving my drilling system making it faster and less labor intensive. My bucket hoist has been working nearly flawlessly. I'm ready for the cold to leave though I'm not looking forward to fighting with runoff again this year. Got some ideas how to mitigate it. More soon. Thannks all for your continued interest.
  2. 1 point
    Late December last year I began digging a 6' x 6' prospect shaft about 100' downstream from the original Cobb prospect shaft. Armed with a 30 lb electric jack hammer, a couple of shovels and my nifty 1/2 size home made "Fairbanks self dumping bucket" system I worked my way down through frozen muck and eventually a 10' gravel layer to bed rock at 62'. On my way down I encountered layers of tangled branches and trees up to 6" in diameter. After 40+ feet I hit fine sand and scattered patches of gravel, fossil bone fragments, then complete bones. I was anticipating these finds but the excitement of actually finding them was intense. The first chunk of mammoth tusk nearly put me over the top. Progressing downward, the bones became less frequent and the pay gravel more dense. I had been told that a jack hammer would be ineffective in frozen gravel. Good I don't listen to everything I hear; it busted up almost as easy as the muck. The gravel graded into fractured and decomposed bed rock and I knew I had finally reached my goal...10 months after starting the project. Before freeze up I was able to wash 5 yards of pay and the result was encouraging. I'll have to wait till late spring to resume processing what I brought up before and what I can hoist this winter. Now it's late November and all is solidly frozen above as well as below ground. Since bottoming out in the shaft I've been devoting most of my time to upgrades above the shaft in preparation for winter work. Also I had to take a part time job in town to help pay for the added expense of moving to a small cabin also in Fairbanks. What little time I've been able to devote to underground efforts have been to expand my working space. On the way down I managed to increase the dimensions of the shaft from 6' x 6' to over 7' square. The plan is to continue out to 10' square before I begin pushing the drifts across the valley. Jack hammering straight down is relatively easy compared to working horizontally and even vertically. Sufficient pressure is difficult to exert out of position so I began working on ideas to free the gravel other than by the traditional steaming or blasting to reduce the great amount of physical labor involved with jack hammering. Suffice it to say, I'm making good progress in those efforts. I'll report on this process in months to come.
  3. 1 point
    Harry Lipke

    Is there really a vein here?

    The old timers did dig there but not to much depth. Maybe 4 or 5 feet. Little "pickers" in their tailings. 4 or 5 grains. I'm thinking they did not go deep enough. Where they did put their adit was in a strange location.... not related to the intersection and no signs of gold in their tailings. They were in bluestone and the area of the intersection has some igneous material.
  4. 1 point
    A series of mud slides seems plausible. That would allow for some settling and deposition of silt/muck layers between events.
  5. 1 point
    All minerals are subsurface estate Mike. It doesn't matter if the minerals are placer or lode. Known lodes are not included in placer claim patents. If a placer claim owner knows of a lode deposit on his claim he must either declare it as a lode claim and pay twice as much per acre ($5 per acre for lode as opposed to $2.50 per acre for placer) for his purchase or the lode will be excluded from the patent grant. This was explained in detail in Section 11 of the 1872 General Mining Act. The inverse is not true. Known placer deposits found on a perfected lode claim are patented along with the lode minerals. Also unknown lode deposits on a patented placer claim belong to the patentee as long as they were discovered after the patent was granted. Until a patent is granted both placer and lode claimaints own all the valuable minerals within their claim as long as the initial discovery supports the type of claim located. You can't locate a lode discovery as a placer claim and you can't locate a placer discovery as a lode claim. A placer claim can never be located over a valid lode claim but a lode claim can be located over a placer claim IF the placer claim owner or an invitee discover a lode. Uninvited prospectors can not discover or locate either type of claim over an active claim. You will probably find it helpful download and read the entire 1872 Mining Act if you want to get a better understanding of the principles behind the mineral grant.
  6. 1 point
    Robert Thomasson

    2017 Plans

    That is a good looking well designed and built trommel! A similar one is on my project list. How did your season at your 80 acre prospect work out? My prospecting this year was a series of distractions and I didn't get to nearly as many places as I planned on. Wait 'til next year.
  7. 1 point
    Tee

    Prospecting Partner Available

    Prospector with tools and skills looking for others to hike out to remote spots seeking pocket and bench gold, gravel and creek prospecting,or grubstaking? Have ref and spots that have produced gold, lode spots, metal detecting old miner camps, treasure hunting lost gold. Or learn to read a creek, learn metal detecting tricks, find old outhouses, miners poke. I prospect full time, I'm in the wilderness most of the time,using horse,packmules or food drop offs,if you just like to experience this life style contact me,or looking to really move material And get the GOLD....Tee
  8. 1 point
    Gary Canning

    VETERANS DAY

    Thank you to all those veterans and active duty who served or at still serving.
  9. 1 point
    Harry Lipke

    Old stamp mills

    Don't have it yet but will.... It is a 5 stamp and all there.
  10. 1 point
    dredgernaut

    2017 Plans

    hey bud , thanks , me too , I built the trommel with a friend , I call it the "dredgenaut" , it is meant to be bucket fed , or small excavator , but the trommel will require direct supervision pretty consistently if using a mini ex. to feed it , and I have not purchased a mini yet , but I am willing and able too, should the need arise , California will not let me use one on my claim , and I am praying the will let me run my trommel , that is why I'm considering other opportunities , I work by myself because I don't have anyone to work with , lol , so I built the trommel to be very mobile , meant to be carried in pieces , 6 to 7 trips , heaviest piece is about 75 lbs. , I can carry each piece like nothing , made a backpack to carry the motors , here is a short , first test run , with old concentrates with some hammered lead added , do you have a place that will allow you to use your mini ,
  11. 1 point
    Here is a bit of gold I have got on a couple recent trips to the northern Nevada goldfields - Been a really wet last 6 weeks or so up this way with thundershowers and lightning on many days. The total weight for this gold is about ten grams, or roughly 1/3rd of an ounce. The bigger pieces were found with Minelab's GPZ 7000, while the smaller stuff, mostly to the right side of the photo, was taken with their SDC 2300 - both very definitely have their place for the types of detecting I do. I've had rain shortened days prospecting where I had to sit in my car and wait out a storm, etc. and some partial days that were spent with some time prospecting but some time driving back and forth to the gold fields and later returning home. I'd say this gold represents the equivalent of about 5 full days of prospecting. I wish I could claim the biggest piece was some faint warble of a signal that I had the talent and skills to hear and identify, but it was a loud booming target less than an inch deep that any metal detector could have heard. When it boomed through my earphones I was sure it was trash, but I dug it and in much of northern Nevada there is not a lot of trash. The second swing of my pick a dirt clod flipped over and the big nugget was shining back at me. That was a nice feeling! Good gold is still out there, it just takes some work, persistence and a bit of luck - and sometimes you need some patience while waiting for the thunderstorms to stop.
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