Gary M

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Gary M last won the day on August 31 2014

Gary M had the most liked content!

About Gary M

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 09/19/1961

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Glendale, AZ
  • Interests
    prospecting, riding, shooting, etc., etc.
  1. Me thinks the $1,000,000 figure is BS. Tony ain't no dummy and more than likely only paid scrap price for it. They would also like you to believe that they get spot for all of their gold clean ups. That's also BS. They're lucky if they get 70% when it's all said and done.
  2. My printer software allows me to print or save pages as PDF, JPEG, TIFF, EPS, or PNG.
  3. Yeah, they've improved them a little, but they're basically still the same bike they were in 1963. Just a little more updated so to speak. Ironically, the gentleman (Orla Larson) that founded Rokon is an avid gold prospector. He just recently moved to Palm Springs, so we'll be getting together sometime this fall/winter and so some prospecting in the Quartzite area. He's getting up there in years and recently broke his pelvis, so hopefully he'll be all healed up in time to hit the gold fields. I think it would be pretty cool to ride and prospect with the founder of the very bike that has allowed so many prospectors to go where very few have ventured.
  4. Start here and make sure to read all the tutorials and help guides. Then search the respective state you wish to prospect in for land status maps and legal descriptions so you know what to enter into the LR2000 system.
  5. Wouldn't matter if I had a 4wd truck or not. The areas I mainly prospect are only accessible with a horse, bike, or on foot. I can't even get my Rhino but within a few miles of most of my areas, so it's just easier to bite the bullet and ride the Rokons all the way in. What I'll probably end up doing once I get all my honey holes located, is I'll sell the Rhino and buy a Can-Am or Ranger and then build me a nice off-road trailer to haul the Rokon on it. That way I can get in a little closer and a little faster, plus I can haul more supplies in to my locations, and then use the Rokon to ferry them in and out to the actual prospects.
  6. The Rokon has many advantages (and very few disadvantages) over a qwad. Number one advantage being it will go places you wouldn't even dare want to try on a qwad, no matter how skilled of a rider you are! Here's a video from my friend Harold (72 year old man) representative of the typical trails in many of my prospecting areas… in fact this particular video is of a trail up by the Wagoner area, which we all know here in this part of AZ has been known to produce many ounces of gold. http://youtu.be/mrwXrTAKccI These trials are easy to ride on the Rokon, as I normally just putt along in 2nd gear and let the bike do all of the work. The bike is fairly low to the ground, so you can easily use your feet to effectively "dog paddle" over the big boulders, rocks, logs, or whatever may be in your path. As a caveat… Rokons can't go everywhere. There are some hills that I just could not make it up due to very loose rock and decomposed granite. The wheels would just spin. In this case I normally hop off the bike and put it in 1st gear and try to walk it up. Sometimes that works, sometimes it doesn't. If you have a riding buddy, then 2 people can easily lift or push the bike up and over any hills or obstacles that you wouldn't even dare want to try with a qwad. As you can see in the photo, between the saddlebags and tote box, I can carry quite a bit of stuff on the bike. I made racks specifically to fit the large totes for both of my bikes. They'll carry all the equipment I need to prospect, plus whatever won't fit in the totes like my large pick, shovel, digging bar, etc., I can tie them on top of the tote as you can see in this photo... About the only disadvantage over a qwad is these bikes are slow (30 mph top speed) and very rough riding at higher speeds as they have no suspension except for the tires and seat. Most of my prospecting areas are roughly 10 miles or so away from where I park my truck, so getting to my prospecting areas usually takes me anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour depending on how rough the terrain is. Regarding price… I guess new Rokons can be on the expensive side. Actually they're no more than what a new dirt bike would cost, so it's all relative. You can get used ones for less than $5000. So all in all, the bottom line is if you want to get into the back country where few have ventured, you can do it for the price of a good gold detector. Right now I'm more or less just starting out my gold prospecting adventures, so my main goal come this fall will be to do tons of sampling work in all the areas I have marked on my geological maps. Once my sampling program is over and I find some productive areas, then I'll be getting a single track trailer to pull behind one of the bikes that can carry my dry washing equipment and what not. My goal is to find several nice productive residual pockets (whether vein or placer) and use them as my own personal ATM's so to speak. One thing about using these Rokons to prospect with, I definitely won't have to worry about claim jumpers, or somebody poking around in one of my productions areas. Unless of course they're riding Rokons also.
  7. I'm thinking of using that fence post idea on some of the pediments that offshoot a known or potential gold bearing hill or mountaintop. What I've found in riding through these areas, is they are not so boulder or rock strewn and are more decomposed and brecciated, thus making it easier to drive a nice long pointed steel rod into the ground. Ideally it would be nice to be able to drive a rod a few feet down on to the basement or bed rock as a pre-test for bringing in an auger to do some sampling. Talk about the potential for a honey hole… imagine millions of years of gold bearing brecciated rock that might have settled 6 feet down into a 100x100 ft. depression, whilst all the fluff and float got carried away by gravity and rushing water. Those are what dream patches are made of.
  8. No problem. Look for something this fall. It's way too hot right now to be out playing in the desert. I make it a rule that I don't go out in any climate that I'm not prepared to spend a few days in walking back home.
  9. As a "realist".. the fact is... here in AZ there are literally 100's of thousands of acres of prime gold bearing land that has yet to be discovered. If you knew me, you'd know that I don't prospect the tourist traps. I like to hunt for gold in places that are pretty much off limits to the average modern day prospector. Not trying to be egotistical or anything, but I'm somewhat of an experienced dirt bike rider, and many of our toughest single-track trails (mostly old mining pack trails) here in the Bradshaws and lower elevations, cut right through some of the best gold bearing ground AZ has to offer. The only way to get into these areas is to either hike, dirt bike, or ride a horse. And you'd better be close to an expert at all of them, lest you don't want to end up as a bag of bones withering away out in the middle of nowhere, or in a deep canyon off the side of some mountain you may have fallen off. So no Chris… you're not being hard on me at all. As I stated, if I can't make at least $50 an hour digging or detecting for gold, then I'm moving on to the many hundreds of other plentiful spots that WILL provide me with those sort of wages. Come this fall I'll be sampling like a mad man, you're more than welcome to join me, and see for yourself exactly the type of terrain and geology I'm referring to. Here's a question for you… do honestly think Rich Hill is the only "mountain" in AZ to give up the gold? I can show a hundred areas just like Rich Hill that are similar in geology and features and all within a 25 mile radius. They're just a little hard to get to… that's all. Just an FYI… if you ever decide you want to join me, all I ask is that you brush up on your dirt bike skills, as this is what you'll be riding. So far I have two of these. I call them my little mechanical mules. They'll go just about anywhere, they don't need feeding or watering, they don't kick, and best of all they're not stubborn!
  10. Bingo… I'll be adding a Falcon to my toolbox this fall and will be doing exactly as you described. Why waste time dry washing an area for $1 an hour that didn't sample out. If I can't sample out at least $50 an hour worth of gold, then time to move on to the next spot. There's way too many profitable areas out there that are just begging for somebody to come along and clean it out.
  11. Small stainless steel tubing, dab of JB weld, slip it over the adjustment screws, let it harden real good, and within 24 hours you'll have easily adjustable air/fuel mixture controls. For fingertip controls, I recommend JB welding or epoxying a little section of vacuum hose or the small rubber tips that you put over vacuum lines on a carb over the tubing you just glued in place. My drywasher blower and gold vac motors run perfect, so I didn't have to do any modifications, but since I saw it on the internet somewhere, it stuck in my memory of a guy doing this to his small 2 stroke motors. Beats spending $200+ on the tools that the EPA requires only "authorized" dealers use to make the adjustments.
  12. That's because they melted it all down. Now the Fed is scrambling to replace it by casting new bars with the "Bundesbank" stamp.
  13. Hi Chuck, Did you ever receive my e-mail with the aerial photos of my prospects I asked you to evaluate? As a newbie to this game, I just wanted your professional opinion if I'm on the right track or not. I'll go ahead and post them here just in case you didn't receive them. Please let me know what you think and what areas you would sample. Regarding reference material, here's a few bulletins that I've found to be very helpful on sampling. Even though the information in these bulletins are almost 100 years old, what is written is still valid today. http://azbest.com/gold/sampling-gold1.pdf http://azbest.com/gold/sampling-gold2.pdf http://azbest.com/gold/sampling-gold3.pdf http://azbest.com/gold/mill-sampling1.pdf
  14. No games... it's called hedging. Farmers do it, the big miners do it, and oil producers do it. Pretty much anybody that harvests, mines, or drills a natural resource that is a traded commodity will hedge that resource against price fluctuations through futures and options contracts.