Reno Chris

Small Trommels - 1 Yard Per Hour

58 posts in this topic

Yeah i bet. Not bad here. Only 20 bucks to ship that big barrel. I thought that was pretty cheep for something that big.

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You know I look at the gold claimer and the thing has a limited number of 3/8th inch holes. Has anyone who used one of these had issues with small material coming through the end and failing to fall into the holes? It just seems like there are so few and if a rock gets in and plugs the hole - it would just be easy to blind up the screening section with so few holes.

Chris, I've been using a gold claimer for several years. I bought it used and the previous owner had drilled the holes out to about 1/2 inch. If you look at the pictures, they don't show the discharge; but there is a ring or nugget trap at the discharge end.

It works great for me.

 

http://goldclaimerbrand.com/goldclaimerpictures.html

 

I'm not sure I follow what you are asking?

RSJ

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I am using a Trommel built by IGR Mining.  You can see them at igrminingsystems.com

 Looks like their website has changed. No Trommel pictures. Here's mine

http://s1184.photobucket.com/user/rabbitt46/media/2013-05-04_15-39-01_25_zps166d1f15.jpg.html

http://i1184.photobucket.com/albums/z337/rabbitt46/2013-05-04_15-39-13_22_zpsd2293b08.jpg

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Chris,

 

I know you started this thread over a year ago.  Did you find a suitable trommel?   I'm not completely happy with any of the available trommels and I'd like to build one, but it's a case of do I want to spend my time building things or out prospecting?

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Robert, the best time to build prospecting equipment is during the winter. That's when I do all mine. Warm up the shop and weld away.

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Dan,

 

Yes, I agree about building things in the winter and that's what I do.    With motorcycles and everything else I just have too many projects and I'm trying to break the habit of doing everything myself.

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Chris, I know you started this thread over a year ago.  Did you find a suitable trommel?

I was looking for some friends and they lost interest in trommels.

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A small cleanup trommel on this scale would be easy to build versus buy.

 

I have been fabricating a reverse helix type of trommel that takes the process to a higher level although more complex fab.

 

A straight trommel with spray bar could be fabricated from light weight materials. It would be good for sampling, recreation or doing clean-ups.

 

There are numerous gear reduction drives suitable for 12 volt operation. I disassembled a Jazzy electric wheel chair that was on its way to a recycler. The wheel drive motors are perfect for trommel drivers. They can be made to be variable speed with a pulse width modulation type of speed control.

 

- Geowizard

Geowizard,

 

Are you making the reverse helix from PVC pipe?  I started out building a trommel a couple of years ago and haven't finished it.  I got a couple of wheelchair motors from ebay and they seem to be good motors for trommels.  Also got a PWM speed controller that seems to be the ticket for controlling speed. 

 

Can you post some pictures of your project?

 

 

- Bob

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Update;

 

I'm getting ready to cut some helix! :)

 

With reference to a one cubic yard trommel, I have run many tests at my mine in Alaska using a Proline 3" Combo and feeding directly from a heaping one yard Bobcat loader bucket. It takes about 30 minutes to hand shovel one cubic yard. So, I'm looking at a two yard per hour trommel if it is being hand fed from an easy to reach source. The trommel has the obvious advantage that it screens and discharges on it's own, unlike the highbanker that requires time to roll the rocks around on the grizzly and clear the oversize rocks out. Since I spend half of my sampling time tending to the Highbanker, it could actually increase production in the sampling process (decrease time required) to run a one yard sample

 

With that in mind, I am fabricating a trommel that washes, screens and feeds a sluice. The sluice can be your existing garden variety sluice.

 

Target cost (materials) is less than $500.

 

More to come.

 

- Geowizard

Excellent.  Looking forward to more to come.

 

- Bob

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I'm wondering about your choice of 4" pitch.  Care to elaborate?

 

The 12" pvc is good stuff, kinda soft for gravel abrasion resistance.  The 1/4" milled grooves will probably flare at the edges.

 

The barrel carriage I used inline roller skate wheels.  They're 3" resin with 2 internal sealed bearings and 5/16" axles.

 

I found some 12' pvc that is 7/16" wall thickness.

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Never having routed pvc before, does the router rpm have to be fairly slow to avoid melting the pvc?  Probably not an issue since variable speed routers are almost standard these days.  About abrasion in service, last year I talked to one of the commercial vendors of pvc reverse helix trommels and he told me he's been selling them for 5 years and never had a report of abrasion reaching a point where it affects the performance.  But I haven't personally confirmed that.

 

I also asked one of the manufacturers of conventional trommels why he didn't offer a reverse helix.  His response was that he'd experimented with them and was never able to get the gold to consistently reach the top of the trommel.  It tended to accumulate about halfway up.  Lots of variables probably involved, including the water flow, helix pitch, width and depth and I don't have any information as to how extensive or definitive his testing was.

 

- Bob

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The pitch, angle of inclination, rpm, water volume are all related to catching your gold and moving it where you need it.

 

The reverse helix is a marvel when the thing is tuned correctly.  I discovered that my machine was too fussy.  I dumbed it down to being a rotating classifier which fed a conventional sluice.  But it was intended tobe a rough recovery, not a finish machine.

 

Maybe yours will co-operate.

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Never having routed pvc before, does the router rpm have to be fairly slow to avoid melting the pvc? Probably not an issue since variable speed routers are almost standard these days. About abrasion in service, last year I talked to one of the commercial vendors of pvc reverse helix trommels and he told me he's been selling them for 5 years and never had a report of abrasion reaching a point where it affects the performance. But I haven't personally confirmed that.

I also asked one of the manufacturers of conventional trommels why he didn't offer a reverse helix. His response was that he'd experimented with them and was never able to get the gold to consistently reach the top of the trommel. It tended to accumulate about halfway up. Lots of variables probably involved, including the water flow, helix pitch, width and depth and I don't have any information as to how extensive or definitive his testing was.

- Bob

My partner and I have run a New Age Reverse Helix trommel for two years without any appreciable wear to the pvc barrel. If there is any issue it would be small gravel becomng caught in the helix requiring manual removal occassionally. Otherwise this tihng has been bulletproof. We run it as a recirc unit. Electric drive and pump 110V.

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My partner and I have run a New Age Reverse Helix trommel for two years without any appreciable wear to the pvc barrel.

 So I am curious - is that occasional weekends? full time 8 hours a day, 5 days a week and 50 weeks a year? Or ???

 

In wear resistance, actual time run and yardage put through makes a huge difference.

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y

 So I am curious - is that occasional weekends? full time 8 hours a day, 5 days a week and 50 weeks a year? Or ???

 

In wear resistance, actual time run and yardage put through makes a huge difference.

My apologies Chris, I should have specified how we use the trommel.  It is used primarily as a sampling tool and most of the use is 2-3 days per week during the fall and winter and less often during the summer here in AZ.  We have on several occasions run it as a semi production unit running 4 or 5 yds per day for a couple of weeks at a time.  It is certainly not a production piece of equipment and is not advertised as such to my knowledge.  We feed it by hand with shovels sometimes but mostly with buckets.  It is labor intensive to operate as a recirc unit as we do.  Too much repeated handling of the material. Fill buckets, empty into trommel, empty the tailings bucket in the recirc tub and so on.  We also drywash with a 151 and then use the trommel to clean up the cons.  This is probably our most productive use of the trommel.  But a very expensive piece of clean up gear.  All that said I still like it.

 

post-15117-0-08392400-1414437046.jpg

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The absolute best small trommel I've seen is a very professional DIY trommel designed and built by  a fellow who goes by the handle of AZViper.  You can find a very long thread on his trommel build by Googling for AZViper Trommel. Wish I had the patience to build one but I'm just too distracted with other priorities.

 

- Bob

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My apologies Chris, I should have specified how we use the trommel.  It is used primarily as a sampling tool

I am sure it would work great for sampling and other occasional use. In those applications it should be just fine.

I just think that plastic as a wear surface for production operations is probably not a good idea - not just in trommels, but in other bigger production operations as well. Rocks and gravels are very abrasive in the long term.

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