Jump to content


Photo

Citrine ? Aragonite? Your Opinion ...


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 chickenminer

chickenminer

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 111 posts
  • LocationChicken, Alaska

Posted 30 March 2013 - 07:42 PM

 Okay here is a specimen. I should have given you a size reference in the photos, but the specimen's are about 3" tall.

 When I test it with acid I get a reaction like it is calcite, but only in places. Almost like it has a calcite coating.

 

 

Attached Files


Dick Hammond
Stonehouse Mining
Chicken, Alaska
http://www.chickenminer.com

#2 Guest_flintgreasewood_*

Guest_flintgreasewood_*
  • Guests

Posted 30 March 2013 - 09:02 PM

Dick,

   I wouldn't have a clue, but they are cool.  Are they from your claim?



#3 chickenminer

chickenminer

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 111 posts
  • LocationChicken, Alaska

Posted 30 March 2013 - 09:09 PM

Kurt,

  They are from the Fortymile, but no, not my claims.


Dick Hammond
Stonehouse Mining
Chicken, Alaska
http://www.chickenminer.com

#4 Reno Chris

Reno Chris

    ICMJ Associate Editor

  • Administrators
  • 301 posts
  • LocationNevada

Posted 30 March 2013 - 09:13 PM

My guess is Aragonite with some magnesium present that slows down the reaction with HCl.

 

Chris


Reno Chris

"So I learned then, once for all, that gold in its native state is but dull, unornamental stuff, and that only low-born metals excite admiration with an ostentatious glitter. However, like the rest of the world, I still go on underrating men of gold and glorifying men of mica. Commonplace human nature cannot rise above that." -- Mark Twain


#5 chickenminer

chickenminer

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 111 posts
  • LocationChicken, Alaska

Posted 01 April 2013 - 12:30 PM

Chris,

  Aragonite is what I wanted to hear :) .  The fellow that first showed me the source insisted on calling it Citrine but it didn't quite fit.

Some samples I have show the radiating pattern and this stuff is too soft for a quartz.  Got to admit though, the light reaction to HCI

 on the sample I tested was confusing.


Dick Hammond
Stonehouse Mining
Chicken, Alaska
http://www.chickenminer.com

#6 Guest_Chris Ralph_*

Guest_Chris Ralph_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 April 2013 - 05:18 PM

I've seen stuff almost exactly like that - same color, same radiating narrow crystals. Calcite reacts fast with HCL, and so does aragonite, but any additional magnesium or iron slows the reacction way down.(and that piece does have some iron from the color). Often with dolomite (50 - 50 calcium and magnesium), it requires scratching with a needle to turn the material to powder before it will bubble with acid.



#7 Guest_Bob(AK)_*

Guest_Bob(AK)_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 April 2013 - 08:53 PM

Hi Dick, nice looking specimen. Do you have an untraviolet light?? I have  aragonite that is much lighter but is a nice green under short wave,  Bob



#8 chickenminer

chickenminer

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 111 posts
  • LocationChicken, Alaska

Posted 01 April 2013 - 09:41 PM

Oh ... good point Bob. Yes, I have UV short, med and long wave light. I'll have to see what it looks like.

BTW .... that box of rocks I have for you sitting here ( I know, I'm terrible) has a couple nice specimens of this aragonite.


Dick Hammond
Stonehouse Mining
Chicken, Alaska
http://www.chickenminer.com

#9 Geowizard

Geowizard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 929 posts
  • LocationArizona (winter) Alaska (summer)

Posted 06 April 2013 - 09:41 AM

Dick,

 

I have a Keene acid test kit from WAY back. Citrine is Quartz SiO4 and would not be affected by hydrochloric acid. Aragonite is a carbonate and would definitely react with the expected fizzing. This is just a field test.

 

Is it coated? Coated with what? Is it a mix of something? If so, what? the questions continue...

 

Gemologists use a hand-held gem scope or spectroscope that uses incoming light to make essentially a rainbow of different colors with interference patterns. Gemstones all have identifying finger prints according to the unique spectrum. My wife used one when she was in the gemstone biz. In this case, it doesn't look like any sizeable stones are available for spectroscopic viewing.

 

Thirdly is elemental analysis using an AA spectrometer. It is costly, but an assay lab can do a 30 plus elemental sweep and help define more exactly what you have. This involves destruction of the sample though!

 

- Geowizard


"Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try!", Dr. Seuss


#10 rabbitt46

rabbitt46

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • LocationWashington state

Posted 05 June 2013 - 11:01 AM

 This involves destruction of the sample though!

 

 

- Geowizard

 

I hate it when they say that.

:wub:


Tonasket, WA where even the jackrabbits carry a lunch





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users