stargatetraveler

Bears On My Claim

46 posts in this topic

Hello, I'm new here and rarely do forums... I just bought a gold claim in BC in the tulameen district and I haven't been to the claim yet and I am wondering what the best thing to do upon arriving at a new claim....I am told the previous claim holders were bothered by bears. there are grizzlies and black bears and a great bear hunting area I'm told . . .should I fire up the chain saw when I get there and announce my presence? I'm sure some clearing and cleaning needs to be done...build a fire? what pushes bears away? yell a bunch and fire off the rifle? play a stereo loud?(but then ya can't hear anything) I have to walk with a cane and I will be alone....I know, alone is not safe for many reasons but that isn't the scenario at hand. . . . I have a 45/70 guide gun, But I just want to pan and shovel in the creek with my highbanker and never see a bear. The 40 hectare claim is at 4000 ft and very thick but a nice creek with gold... I won't be bringing any food for them to smell but I hear bears like to chew on gas caps cause they smell good so what don't they like to smell? Hopefully the noise of the pump running the highbanker should bother them and avoid my area. So, What should one do when arriving at a new spot in the middle of nowhere in grizzly country alone? post-16197-0-21341800-1411210096_thumb.jpg Thanks for your replies

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"So, What should one do when arriving at a new spot in the middle of nowhere in grizzly country alone?"

 

I'm assuming that's a serious question.  Do others beside me consider you insane?  

 

You know a grizzly will kill you right?  There's not enough gold on your claim to warrant the risk.  So, I wonder what you're thinking.

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"Do others beside me consider you insane?"

No, no I don't.

Bears are opportunistic omnivores. I've lived, worked and played in bear country all my life (60+ years). The only bears that really scare me are unattended cubs.

Let them know your in the area and they will avoid you just as you want to avoid them.

Keep your food and cooking area some distance from your camp and work site.

Don't camp next to trails.

Practice situational awareness.

"You know a grizzly will kill you right? There's not enough gold on your claim to warrant the risk. So, I wonder what you're thinking."

Stargatetraveler faces a greater risk on the highway traveling to and from his claim.

"Fear is the mind killer." Frank Herbert, "Dune"

It would appear at least one person fears adventure. Packaged tours are just mobile museums.

Did you sample his claim to determine the profit/risk profile? How much would be enough gold?

What were you thinking posting such a snarky comment?

eric

Geowizard and Ronald C like this

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Thank's Eric N....I guess I should say also I won't be camping at this claim and I'll bring no food, just black coffee. This claim is on an actively used forest service road that connects a highway to a town 25 miles away and the road goes up one side of the valley following the creek over a bridge and back down the otherside of the creek/valley so the creek/claim is an island between the road. One slight concern is if the locals dump deer carcasses or trash, people like to throw shit off bridges sometimes and I'm sure everyone fishes there. No I'm not trying to Rambo my way out there and I'm not insane, I've spent most of my free time hunting and fishing in maine and now living in the northwest ...the northwest has bigger bears that one needs to educate themselves..."Your mind is your weapon" ....So when I arrive at the claim - make lots of noise???.... that's easy.

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I think what geowizard said has a high value, but if your goal is to never see a bear, I don't really think that is possible. There is no magic formula to make bears stay away.

Being aware and taking proper steps are the best way to deal with them.

 

Bear don't like dogs. Maybe keep a few with you. There is no way the dongs could defeat the bear, but its a instinct thing that bears would rather avoid dogs.

 

However dogs or not, if a bear decides to come into your camp, he will.

Geowizard and Ronald C like this

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And thank you Geowizard, from everything I've read in the last 4 months - every bear encounter is different and some bears are aggressive and others are fine given their space... just like people, some should be shot and most are okay. I know that if a grizzly wants to do anything he can if he wants.....I'm just wondering about a few details like "When I arrive" I don't want to go alone but I can't find anyone interested in going for the day and I want to see the place before the snow flies. I don't plan on busting through the brush and saplings and like I said there is a road on both sides of the creek and a well used trail head that hikers park at near the bridge, I know a bear can cruise through anywhere and dogs sometimes lead them right back to you when barky is getting too much action and runs to you bringing booboo fast on his heals. I've e-mailed 7 guides in alaska and all said to arm myself with a marlin guide gun, If you are going to carry a rifle for bear defense make sure it is designed to do the job - one guide though scared me and said "a mossberg 12ga. with buckshot is fine for grizzly protection....I've read many sites about bear defense and the Canadian law enforcement guide for bear handling and buckshot is crazy to use. 

When I arrive there I figured I'll drive up and down the road a few times and just sit and watch and see who's up to what and drink my coffee for an hour and then get out and fire up the chain saw and clean up whatever needs clearing then some sample panning....other people go there to fish and hike .... only 1-2 people a year die from bears in north america - 300 people die drowned in their bathtubs a year, How do you want to be remembered?

"True adventure requires the sense of encountering danger and living through it to carry back the tale." 
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Thanks Reno - what you said I think is one of the top rules of the bush and is what most in alaska say - "Being aware and taking proper steps are the best way to deal with them". No I realize there is no way to Not see a bear in the mountains...I just want to try to avoid them the best I can. how about some shooting/targets while I drink my coffee - I can't imagine any animal not running away from the area with some guy shooting off a 20 round box of 45/70 ammo with his coffee a few rounds every sip, like 15-20 minutes of shooting at a gallon jug of water.???

Ronald C likes this

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With reference to the prior claimants being "bothered by bears";

 

There are those that like to tell Bear Stories (BS). I hear them all the time from rival claimants that want me to shiver in my boots. One of these times, I'm going to make some Big Foot tracks around their cabins. :)

 

- Geowizard

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I was wondering about people in RV's with a dog or cat parked in BC/Alaska's grizzly areas like at a claim or in the mountains where there's dog/cat food in the RV - are there many occurrences of bears tearing open an RV for snacks and or eating your pet say while you're out fishing for a bit or getting some wood and the dogs been in the creek all day and ya want him to dry off and ya go down to the creek to catch a few for dinner. I think I know this answer.... if you bring food, they will smell it and you'll have to deal with whatever happens, . . . .just wondering how safe an RV is

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Most bears won't bother you and your camper, but that ONE bear will create a whole heck of a problem.  I have run across several campers in northern Idaho (where I used to live) out in the clearwater national forest that where pealed back like sardine cans.  The bears can tear it up pretty bad if they really want in. The good thing about a camper is that it gives you a time buffer to be prepared with lead.  In a tent you don't have that buffer, the bear is a true threat now with no time and no protection.

 

Have you thought about an electric fence around the area you want to work?  They aren't that expensive and are pretty easy to set up. If I was alone in the wilderness that is what I would do, plus I would also carry on my side just in case of that ONE bear.  Bears are weird creatures, just don't suprise them and they wil be pretty good neighbors. We have lived with them for years, just remember they aren't predictable and each one will react differently.   Good luck to you.     

Ronald C likes this

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My thoughts are...

 

1. The advice most given while in bear territory is most bears will avoid you and the area if you make lot of noise, but I think the noise should be fairly constant, running the engine for your pump will help a lot I would think, also maybe singing loudly while you work, if you don't have a good singing voice all the better the bears may run the other way faster to get away from you :P , but as mentioned there's always that one bear that will not be bothered and will check you out, which means you maybe risking an attack.

 

2. You said you want to do a little panning and working a shovel for your highbanker that means you will be keeping your head down while panning/shoveling and will miss that "one" bear approaching, I think a electric fence will not deter that "one" bear that the noise doesn't deter, I would rig some trip lines a couple feet of the ground around your area with lots of noise making items attached to the trip line, e.g. groups of metal items that will clang together on each trip line, etc. (don't use any metal items that once contained food, you will never be able to clean them enough to lose the food smell) that would get your attention if a bear hits the trip lines, the noise from the trip lines may make the bear turn around and leave, but will also give you a warning of a possible approaching bear, keep in mind that bears can run up too 30 mph to 35 mph when they want to get at or catch something, so if you use trip lines put them out a ways so you have time to grab your rifle.

 

Good luck and keep us posted on how you do, we would also love to see some photos of the gold you find!!

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Thanks all.... enough with the attack reports, I read them all, for the past 200 years of reporting.  Yeah I just noticed some electric fences for beehives.... an 8 foot chain link fence would be nice around the "Island" a road almost encircles the creek...

No one has said anything about my shooting scenario, that makes noise....I have a new marlin 45/70 guide gun that is fun to shoot and I've only shot 4 boxes(80rnds) out of her....(before anyone says "you should know your gun" I've owned a marlin 30-30 since 1980 and got my first deer with it and my new guide gun is no different in handling and hits the same, just a louder bark.) 

My claim is on ILLAL creek that flows into the Tulameen river and it's at bridge #3 that is also a Trail head parking near the bridge in a hiking book called 103 hikes in BC I was told about.

 

Well how about any miners or hunters that live in Tulameen area, or know the Tulameen river valley/coquihalla mountains.... being Alone in the mountains is always a risk...but people go outside alone all the time and I am looking for others to go.

 

How can I post a picture from my hard drive? I'd like to post a picture of the claim. I don't store photo's at a URL unless facebook pictures...

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thanks Arctic-moose - yeah walls are nice for that buffer to "git yer gun" ...what's that term I heard alaskan hunters use for "campers in a tent?  "twinkie? burrito? the bear just grabs the tent and runs off with all inside..... I've read enough alaskan hunting stories about a griz sticking his head into a tent and both hunters in their bags with guns drawn and the bear left and the tale was told, if the bear had attacked or they had fired most likely only a bloody camp would've been found and maybe a dead bear a hundred yards away. I would never camp in a tent in grizzly country, I will wimp out to tenting. not much else.

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Jeezum, enough with the fear mongering. I have been a lobster diver in new england since 1984 - like black bears every shark I've ever seen ran away as fast as they could, Granted I've never seen a great white and they're plentiful around cape cod and I never want to see one diving...they are the only shark that doesn't do any display like circling and darting with erect fins, bumping and then the attack if you're still in the water, Great whites give no warning and if they want you they eat you. There are many bigger predators in the seas than me - most people dive their whole lives and never get bit. . . .some fall out of their bayliner and are eaten a hundred yards off shore where you and your kids were playing on the beach 4 hours earlier.....might get hit by lightning or a meteor.

...there was no extensive mining on that hill, they logged it off...only the chinese prospectors and some sourdoughs in the 1890's ran up and down the creek with rockers and sluices... the major minin' went on up and down the tulameen river. all the claims on the Illal creek were made in the 70's and the reports say only hand work was done.

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and Huh? when I go into the woods alone I am always on an elevated awareness...this is a good thing, I got's to watch my own back, But I'm still calm and enjoying myself, I enjoy carrying a rifle in the woods and I am almost always by myself. ...There's also cougars in them Tulameen hills and coyotes I imagine, I was reading about cougar attacks  and holy #$%@# ...go read the one about the woman that was killed in 1996 I think by a 65 pound cougar defending her kids near Tulameen, she fought it for an hour and died minutes after help arrived...unbelievable. . .them cougars seem sneaky and lightning fast too by what I was reading (the last 20 years of mountain lion attacks).... So just lions and bears in Tulameen, No tigers. 

There is gold there, the claim seller does a random sample pan and takes a picture and guarantees the claim. He sells lots of claims in B.C.  So we'll see in a week or so. I just finished building my highbanker, tested it today and it's ready. 5 foot sluice box 12 inches wide, wash box is 16" x 34" and waitin' on a Honda WH15X 1.5 inch HP water pump.

AndrejKuzin likes this

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