Guest flintgreasewood

"flour Gold" Recovery

44 posts in this topic

flintgreasewood- I have experience with chlorine to produce gold chloride. The dissolution process took 18hrs, precipitation process 6 hrs. it produced .9996 gold. Chemical assay value of concentrate 5.12 ot, recovered 4.98 ot that's better than 97% recovery. No harsh chemicals to dispose of, re-use of solution, simple precipitation method.

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I have a miner friend who has come into an extensive placer deposit containing a very significant amount of flour gold...determined by fire assay.  So far he has been unable to come up with any method of recovery.   Amalgamation would probably do the trick but he won't use mercury and he is apparently unwilling to ship his cons to Texas to have cyanidation done.  Any ideas?

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I have a miner friend who has come into an extensive placer deposit containing a very significant amount of flour gold...determined by fire assay.  So far he has been unable to come up with any method of recovery.   Amalgamation would probably do the trick but he won't use mercury and he is apparently unwilling to ship his cons to Texas to have cyanidation done.  Any ideas?

I could most likely help him if he is interested I can be contacted at briankmyshak@yahoo.ca  I have a system that works really good on flour gold.

Joe B likes this

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I could most likely help him if he is interested I can be contacted at briankmyshak@yahoo.ca  I have a system that works really good on flour gold.

I may also be reached at 780-603-7267

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flint..... I see you have re-posted your "friends" problem....after the last round I assumed you had the solution found...If you have not ....a safe economical chemical process is still the solution for you, I have access to a pilot plant that can fulfill your requirements....what tonnage are you talking about.....check out trilogyhep.com

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gmeyer -

If you actually have an operational pilot plant, I've love to take a look at it. I know my chemistry. The toxic byproduct I was talking about is not a result of generating the chlorine, but the result of free chlorine or hypochlorites interacting copper, lead, mercury, silver, arsenic, antimony, zinc and other metals as well as with sulfides to generate acid.

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Chris-  We actually have a operational pilot system with a max capacity of 300lb/day. Have you visited trilogyhep.com yet?,pictures are there. The pilot system was developed for Sleepy Bear Mine concentrates.  We are currently in the construction phase of a 2000lb/day unit with Sleepy Bear Mine in Randsburg, CA.  Let's get a non-disclosure signed between us and get you out here.....call me @ 8058904446 or email, George@trilogyhep.com 

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I looked at the website, and there is not a lot of information. There are pictures but they are just of the piping, and could be from almost any kind of chemical processing operation, with the exception of the precipitated gold photo.

 

Some months back, I wrote an article for the Prospecting and Mining Journal on alternative leachants for gold ore processing, including chlorine.

 

I do pass by Randsburg regularly as I have family in southern California. I will contact you.

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Chris-  You are right there is not a lot of information on our website, there is a lot of information that is still proprietary until the 1ton unit is complete. Please keep in mind that the pilot unit is located in Oxnard, Ca. I think you know Joe Martori at Sleepy Bear don't you?

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I know of Joe - I have never met or spoken to him - we have a common friend. No, I didn't know the pilot unit unit was in Oxnard - there is something the website might want to include which isnt proprietary. Too bad this didnt happen sooner, I've been in the Oxnard area within the last 6 months, but probably wont be out that way again until December.

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I have a miner friend who has come into an extensive placer deposit containing a very significant amount of flour gold...determined by fire assay.  So far he has been unable to come up with any method of recovery.   Amalgamation would probably do the trick but he won't use mercury and he is apparently unwilling to ship his cons to Texas to have cyanidation done.  Any ideas?

If this is still in the works contact me through this forum and we will set up further communication.

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I have a miner friend who has come into an extensive placer deposit containing a very significant amount of flour gold...determined by fire assay. So far he has been unable to come up with any method of recovery. Amalgamation would probably do the trick but he won't use mercury and he is apparently unwilling to ship his cons to Texas to have cyanidation done. Any ideas?

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Im using a v matting under a thicker miners moss. just wondering if this will work well for flour and flake gold from edmonton area river . or should i invest in different matting ?

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I recover flour gold all of the time with my high banker actually that is pretty much all I recover except for an occasional picker , just use a environmentally friendly recovery method mine works , I just ran some paydirt through my high banker the other day and recovered more flour gold on the Yakima river , if your deposit is that large hire an experienced crew and make a living ...

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:)Just use a highbanker with miners moss and ribbed rubber matting underneath it and expanded metal on top , that is the best method of recovery , I just ran some paydirt through my high banker two days ago and recovered a nice little amount of flour gold , miners moss does not lose gold when used properly, I use mine almost everyday even in the winter , ground is a little frozen but the river water is not , I have been doing that for the  last 20 yeas and the 25 years before that, I have been mining and experimenting with different configurations for a number of years and if you notice most commercial operations use this method , except for ELKO Nevada because the gold is microscopic....

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