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Harry Lipke

Gear Reducer For Trommel

13 posts in this topic

Harry,

 

No, but I see that Ohio Gear is still in business and still makes the D3 series.  I looked on their website but didn't find a pdf download shop manual.  It might be worth a try to call them and ask.  Not sure if posting outside links is acceptable here, but you can easily find Ohio Gear's website with Google.

 

If it's bad bearings it might not be too bad of a job. If the gears themselves are no good you're very likely better off finding another gearbox.

 

Bob

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Yes, it is a right-angle worm gear reducer. It was on a trommel I just bought and the bearings on either side of the worm gear seem to have a lot of play in them. Not sure what is acceptable.

The trommel was set up with a 3600 rpm electric motor direct to the reducer. Not sure if the reducer is up to those rpms?? Maybe that is why the bearings seem loose?....

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I don't think 3600 RPM is going to be a problem. By the bearings seem "loose", do you mean up/down and side/side sloppy? Or sloppy as in pushing/pulling on the shafts?

  You really should not have much play up/down or side to side. If so, I would replace the bearings. If it is push/pull slop, that could be shims wearing.

 These reducers are pretty basic inside if you need to replace bearings or do a little shimming.

 

 Are the seals leaking?

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There is a slight movement when you press/pull on the shaft. That movement seems acceptable to me. It's the up/down side/side play that I'm concerned with.

If I were to tap one of the bearing races in 1/16 of an inch, that would solve the problem. But, I don't think that is what I should be doing?

The input and output bearings are tight. Only the input seal was leaking.

Glad to hear the rpms are ok. Calcs give me about 18 rpms on the drum when operating. (75:1 with a 14" drivewheel and 36" drum.)

Thanks for the advice.

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Doesn't sound your reducer is in bad shape. Tried to find a schematic for the reducer to see what type of bearings it had, but couldn't.

   I would not have a problem tapping one of the bearing races to tighten the tolerance. Just be sure nothing binds after you do and you

can turn the shafts freely.

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Might just tap the race....

I have read that you have to use a special lub in them for the bronze gears? What do you use or know about that? Also, I read that if you are running them at higher rpms, you use less lub or they will heat up?? They list the D3 series at 1750 rpms....

For your information, this is the reducer:

http://apps.kamandirect.com/ohiogear/?page_id=150

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Harry,

 Okay, I see they are tapered bearings. So yes, the shims are going to tighten up your bearing by adjusting the race.

Your tapping it is doing the same thing.

  No idea on the bronze gears. I don't have any worm gear reducers. I just use 85/90 in mine.

 

Boy if they list the D3 as 1750, you might want to get a 1800 RPM motor. Or use a short chain on input with 2:1 sprockets.

Running it at 3600 will certainly reduce its life span.

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Harry,

Just wondering how the gear reducer is working out? I read this thread kind of late and I'm kind of concerned that

the play in the shaft is going to affect the worm gear mesh. If it isn't adjusted right it can wear the gear pretty fast, especially at 3600 RPM.

About the oil for bronze gears, some extreme pressure (EP) oil additives are corrosive to copper alloys. There is a test called ASTM D130

and non-corrosive oil will have an ASTM D130 score of 1a or 1b. That info should be on the label. Mobil SHC 634 is fine.

The warnings about too much lube apply mainly to grease lubricated bearings. We always want to pack them completely full and it can cause overheating

when the grease churns around in the bearing with no place to go.

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