Ground penetrating radar   1 member has voted

  1. 1. How much would you pay for the services for someone to detect by radar hidden precious minerals in a hard rock formation?

    • 5% of the find after extraction costs
      0
    • 10% of the find after extraction costs
      0
    • 15% of the find after extraction costs
      0
    • 50% of the find after extraction costs
      0
    • 80% of the find after extraction costs
      0
    • $200 per radar generated immage
    • $10,000 per day of testing
      0
    • Another offer you my have
      0
  2. 2. If the radar operator identified, extracted, processed to near pure concentrate, what is the minimum you be willing to receive back from operator?

    • 10%
      0
    • 15%
      0
    • 20%
    • 30%
      0
    • 40%
      0
    • 50%
      0

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

33 posts in this topic

I didn't know GPR could distinguish precious metals from other mineralization.

 

It's been my understanding that GPR records the distance to boundary layers - not degrees of mineralization or types of mineralization. Has the ability of GPR advanced far beyond my previous study?

 

Could you educate us on GPR mineral discrimination ability?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know much about GPR.  Just saw it used on Gold Rush and googled GPR and saw many responses.  Asking if anyone out there has more knowledge than me on this topic and would care to share some?

 

If an EDXRF (Energy Dispersive X Ray Flourescense) machine can decipher metals (by sight) why can't a radar (by energy waves) do the same?

 

My poll asks the value the market would pay if someone could develop this type of system. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ground Penetrating Radar sends Very High Frequency (VHF) radio signals into the ground.

 

GPR is excellent working on a concrete floor and looking for rebar or conduit.

 

- Geowizard 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very very helpful information Geowizard. Thanks.

Then what high tech technology is available to the modern miner today or has none developed because of the nature of rock, soils, terrains and territories, etc.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well gee if it was on Gold Rush it must be useful..... about as useful as the useful idiots on that program...... :blink:

 

I have to agree with Geowizard.... get and learn how to use a good metal detector. VLF or PI.... both have their place in prospecting.

Geowizard likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I referred to seeing radar, or something like it, being used on Gold Rush it was on a special episode on another miner in Alaska, not the main cast. And I won't put down anyone for trying as they have.

I don't knock the old tried and true methods, they are good. But let's not ignore imagination and fail to explore and test new ideas or methods.

Like has anyone use drones for maping or photography? What was your experience?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drones?

 

On LinkedIn, there is a group that discusses the application of drones.

 

Shawn Ryan (the famous prospector) purports to be using drone technology in the Yukon.  

 

- Geowizard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On that episode of Gold Rush, Freddy Dodge hired a couple guys to use GPR to survey the bedrock in the creak they were mining.

 

They then used a drone to image the creak, and then composited the GPR data with the imagery to identify areas of the creak that were conducive to enrichment.

They were successful in locating a number of depressions/pockets and areas where the flow should slacken at flood stage.

 

I believe there results (gold in the cleanup) showed that the data was pretty accurate.

 

They had already planned to mine the entire creak, so was it worth the expense? maybe.

If you wanted to high grade the creak though, it would show you the areas of highest probability of success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is just a TV show.

A drama series quite similar to soap operas.

Gold opera is the male version of soap operas. Though a couple of my troops hurried through the noon mess to watch "General Hospital".

 

GPR has real uses when the ground is homogenous. It can detect differences in density.

As a former combat engineer in the army, we had mine detector that used GPR as the means of detection. The output was audio and not visual. It operated somewhere in the 400MHz band.

Worked well for some mines in some soils. Worse than worthless for many (IMO all) operating conditions. It ain't like missing a gold nugget. Missing a mine can have serious repercussions.

 

Hardrock and placer are different animals.

For hardrock, GPR is worthless.

For placer, it is at best marginal for detecting depth to bedrock. Seismic would work just as or better than GPR.

 

For hardrock? Core drill.

For placer? Bucket drill.

 

eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Gold Rush is drama but still fun to watch.

What process or mechanics makes GPR different from metal detectors or what makes metal detectors different than GPR?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Admittedly I have no experience using a MD inside a hardrock mine.

In the August 2013 issue of ICMJ, there is an article "Underground in the Original 16-1 Mine".

It states the operators use a MD.

 

But please, once and for good, forget about GPR.

It only works well in homogenous ground.

It is radar and NOT a metal detector.

Heterogeneous ground is far too noisy to give any meaningful results.

Same goes for hardrock.

If it wasn't heterogeneous, there wouldn't be any mineralization.

Imagine trying to detect the whereabouts of an airplane with radar when the skies are full of aluminum chaff.

GPR has the same problem but in the ground rather than the air.

eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To the editor: I realize I probably started this discussion in in the wrong place. It should be under the Metal Detecting catagory. Can you move it and then erase this note?

Sorry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All responses are accurate as current configured GPR systems don't work.  Simple physics makes it impossible.  One of the pieces of equipment that was tested, with good results, at the 16:1 Mine in Alleghany I am currently evaluating.  It is a new design that overcomes the operational shortcomings of current available GPR equipment.  With further testing we may be able to detect specific minerals and metals by their signatures within their home environment.  Currently am looking for varied environments to do further testing, so someday we may call it a metal detector too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been held for a long time that the upper useable frequency for metal detection is 100 KHz.

 

It's not about technology - it's about the physics of rock materials. It's not that nobody had the capacity to "think" about the possibility - it's about the physics of rock materials.

 

In the world around us, perception is based on "contrast". One word - "contrast".

 

Imaging of a single gold nugget in a rock is easy. It has contrast! The problem is a matter of discriminating among other solid objects that have equal contrast and look like or are perceived to be the same as a gold nugget. Relatively low cost, light weight, high performance tools are already on the market that do the job of detecting gold nuggets. :)

 

- Geowizard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now