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plumas.placer.miner

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  1. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Ronald C in Pandora Mining Company...   
    Anyone seen this site? Spendy claims, but the web site itself and the photos are great! Love the motion graphics background and the simple interactivity.
     
    It was posted on Reno/Tahoe Craigslist this morning.
     
    http://www.pandoramining.com/
  2. Like
    plumas.placer.miner reacted to flintgreasewood in Still Hard At It At Cobb Prospect   
    Back in November, Geowhiz wondered what was happening with Cobb Prospect;
    was I finished for the season?  In a nutshell...things are ongoing at Cobb
    and my "season" never ends.  It's just that what I have been
    doing has basically been relatively uneventful .  Though of late that has
    begun to change, enough so that I've decided to resume documenting my
    endeavors.


       The rains of last summer played minor havoc with my claims in
    Fairbanks as they did Geo's in Ophir, though I was not impacted nearly to the
    extent many miners were statewide.  Frequently I had to extricate my 4
    wheeler from super saturated bogs enroute to the prospect or build makeshift
    bridges over my swollen little creek.  But my biggest headache was
    incessant seepage into the shaft.  And, of course, there were the never
    ending equipment malfunctions. 


       As summer wound down and crisp fall weather set in it became
    apparent I was not going to be bringing in the gold we were counting on to help
    pay the bills any time soon.  I had to take a job in town.  About the
    same time my wife and I realized that wintering through in our little travel
    trailer was not really an option so we rented a small “wet” cabin on the banks
    of the Chena River at the west end of Fairbanks.  I arranged my work
    schedule to have Friday through Sunday off so I could devote time to work the
    prospect.  It was a welcome relief to finally have enough money to
    purchase some necessary equipment and supplies not the least of those being my
    first snow machine.  I knew it wouldn't be long before my old, tired 4
    wheeler wouldn't be able to manage the coming snow.  A '93 Skandic II with
    reverse and electric start fit the bill nicely.  Fairbanks got its first
    measurable snow, 6", at the end of October and that provided barely enough
    cover to operate my sled.  It wasn't long before I was grinding along on
    bare gravel ever more frequently.  You can imagine I was not enjoying my
    first snow machining experience and even considered selling it. 


    Fortunately I didn't follow through with that notion.  When finally the
    good snow cover arrived I discovered what a delightful experience snow
    machining can be.  I bought a heavy duty Beaver plastic sled to haul stuff
    in and became a regular Alaska "freighter" transporting everything
    from fuel to lumber to wood stoves and generators from my Elliot Highway drop
    off down the one mile trail into the valley.


        The constant runoff into the shaft even as temperatures
    dipped below freezing inexorably built up on the walls and made the remaining
    opening so tight I could no longer get my bucket down.  Seepage continued
    till the shaft was filled within 6' of the deck.  Soon it was cold enough
    for heavy ice to form on the surface, but I was so frustrated with the whole
    mess I found it difficult to deal with the problem. When I finally decided to
    bite the bullet and do something about getting the shaft drained my chain saw
    came in handy in cutting the ice into manageable blocks for removal.  Then the idea occurred to me to remove the
    ice by heating the water in the shaft with my steam coil.  There was still water to be had in the pond after
    I broke through the ice to reset the sump pump. 
    I  was able to send steam to the
    bottom of the shaft for several hours before I had to shut down. I drained the
    system and heated the coil sufficiently to remove any remaining water.  Next day saw the same procedure.  The day following I turned on the high
    pressure water pump that feeds the coil and fired up the burner.  To my extreme disgust steam began blasting
    from the center of the coil.  I had a
    rupture caused by water that somehow didn’t get evacuated the previous evening
    and had frozen.  That put an end to plans
    for warming the ice out.  Any other plan
    would require a shaft drained of water , but now the hoses were partially frozen
    and one length was also frozen to the side of the shaft.  I was able to pull the pump and one 50’
    length of hose.  A propane weed burner
    enabled me to thaw out the hose and warm up the pump but I had to get another
    length of hose in town before the draining could continue.  Several days later and with the pump setup
    complete and in working order I resumed the operation.  All went well and I had 30+ feet of the shaft
    free of water and then the pump quit. 
    Back up the whole works came to be disassembled to determine the
    problem.  When I couldn’t ascertain the
    nature of the malfunction I arranged for Ice Water Well [yes, the owners’ last
    name really is“Ice”] to check things out. 
    A week later they called to tell me I needed a new motor…bearings and
    shaft had issues most probably caused by the strain of pumping too much mud.  Another week went by before I was able to get
    the pump back in the shaft and get the remaining 30+ feet drained.   With no clear plan to get the ice out I
    resumed work on the mine shacks.


        A friend basically gave me several
    thousand square feet of foil backed R8 insulation he had salvaged from an old
    shop building somewhere near Coldfoot [?]. 
    The plan was to cut spruce poles for the uprights and cross members,
    sheath them with ½” osb, and overlay that with the insulation.  Ideally the outer skin would be more ½” osb
    but I couldn’t afford that, but I had a long way to go before I needed  to worry about what to use.  Always, however, was the issue of the shaft
    ice hanging like an ominous cloud over my head, and I couldn’t ignore it.  I could once again mechanically chip it out
    as I had done the previous summer and by now I had repaired the steam coil to
    thaw the chipped ice, but it would be useless as I had no water supply…the
    creek and pond were frozen solid.   Sharing my dilemma with a fellow miner he
    suggested an electric heater suspended at the bottom of the shaft to do the
    melting.  My generator could handle 3500
    watts so I picked up two “milk house” heaters with a max output of 3000
    watts.  I bundled the two heaters
    together with a trash can lid fixed over the top to protect from dripping water
    and lowered them into the shaft.  The 150
    watt LED light at the bottom of the shaft revealed dripping water so I knew the
    heaters were doing their job.  The problem
    was I could see it would probably take several months to thaw all the ice at
    the rate it was going.  What next?  I had considered sending the diesel space
    heater down but before I went ahead with that idea I saw a compact propane
    fired space heater with a btu range of 30,000 to 60,000…substantially more than
    the electric  heaters.  Since I didn’t want to send a 20lb propane
    bottle down in the shaft with the heater I needed to have a long  supply hose. 
    That need was filled by an old 80’ air hose I had laying around.  It was a bit tricky sending down a heater,
    hose and electric cord suspended by a ¼” nylon rope.  It worked. 
    Even on the heater’s lowest output he water poured down the sides of the
    shaft.  But after a couple of minutes the
    heater shut off.  I pulled it up, relit and
    sent it back down about 15’.  Same
    thing.  Tried it a few more times with
    the same result.  It became apparent the
    oxygen was being used up and the CO was extinguishing the flame.  I connected an air line from a small
    compressor to the intake of the heater to supply additional oxygen but it wasn’t
    sufficient to keep the heater lit.  I
    needed to either suck out the heavy CO from the shaft or force a large volume
    of air into the shaft.  Either way I
    needed a large blower fan and some flexible ducting.  I got a slavaged furnace fan and 6 10’
    lengths of corrugated drain pipe.  I
    first rigged the fan so as to suck the CO. 
    No matter where I placed the ducting…on the bottom or right below the heater
    the flame went out after a few minutes. 
    It was evident a large volume of air needed to be force fed to the
    heater, so I accomplished that with a 4 inch flange and an elbow and a few feet
    of bailing wire.  So far I’ve run the
    heater for about 4 hours uninterrupted and the ice is disappearing
    rapidly.  I’ll keep you posted how that
    goes.


       I’ve discovered the usefulness of
    rubber roof membrane and I determined it would be a fine exterior skin for my
    mine shacks.  There are quite a few
    roofing companies in Fairbanks and I found one that had a pile of salvaged
    membrane I could have.  It was snow
    covered and partially frozen to the ground and it was HEAVY.  With a shovel and a 2x4 pry bar I managed to
    loosen the pile enough to get a tow strap attached so I could pull it free and
    out where I could lay it out and cut it into three manageable pieces.  Well, almost manageable.  Two of us could barely lift each piece into
    my pickup. I got a 50’ x 30’ piece for $50!! 
    What a score.  Back at the mine I
    realized I would have to keep the rubber skin from crushing the insulation so I
    accomplished that with short posts through the insulation, fixed to the inner and
    poles across the posts.  I now have one
    of three shacks covered over.  Much of my
    efforts have taken place after dark under flood lights and a headlamp.   At first I was reluctant to work at night
    but now I have come to actually enjoy it.  Here in Alaska in the winter if you wait till
    it’s light to get busy, you’ll not get much accomplished.  I’m also learning to be adept at performing
    many common tasks wearing heavy gloves or mittens.  It takes patience, perseverance and a little
    bit of idiocy to work out doors, at night in the arctic winter.  Though I must concede, this has been a mighty
    easy going fall and winter so far up here in the great North.  And from what they say, it’s supposed to
    remain mild for the duration.  Waaaah!

     
  3. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Mining License Plate Frames?   
    All good points to be sure.
     
    But I am of a slightly different ilk I guess. I don't (can't) subscribe to the "We have already lost the war" attitude in any of the facets of my life.  Maybe experience will teach me differently in the long run, and the likelihood that I will join the ranks of "I should just shut up, put my head down, and mine", will increase over time, but I guess I will need to learn this myself; I am someone who learns by my own experiences. Associative learning is challenging because the variables can change in human behavior.
     
    Insofar as education is concerned, or on the subject of learning, one should be careful about generalized assertions or conclusions. I have been teaching in colleges and universities for about 20 years and I might know a little about the topic. This much I know for sure: Humans can alter their behaviors if they are motivated to do so. This happens every single day in my classrooms and labs. In fact, behavior modification is one of the definitions of learning, and it is a measurable definition. It's testable and repeatable. In education, I don't have the luxury of giving up on my students just because "behavior is learned in preschool". Behavior is learned, and reinforced, and altered, throughout one's life. Well, at least it is to those who are motivated to learn.
     
    I am motivated to learn about mining, and I thank all of you folks for helping me to do that in your own ways.
  4. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Claim Trespassing, Posting On The Internet - Youtube   
    Dear Newbie,
     
    I echo your sentiment about ne'er-do-wells who behave disrespectfully and irreverently on our claims. That said...
     
     
    ...not everyone in this community reflects your stated opinion of our state and federal employees. In my experience, many of them are rather quite over-educated, and some may even be considered professionals. That's how I like to think of them, and approach them, especially since I quite often intend to solicit their support on a varying range of issues. It's unwise, in my opinion, to dismiss so completely such a valuable resource, especially since they likely share our opinions of those vandals.
  5. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Using Water In A Nearby Creek?   
    Hi Rod, Thanks for your reply.
     
    Access to my claim is pretty good most of the way, (4x4 required for the last distance), and elevation is 5300' to 5600'. Suffice it to say, I am a seasonal miner...pretty much restricted to Summer, but sometimes I can make it up there on weekends. I look for reasons to go to the claim in the off seasons. It's amazing up there.
     
    Insofar as the current legal questions are concerned, I see mining as a legitimate and historical stakeholder for resources, among many stakeholders and interests, and one that I am willing to defend with more than just words. That said however, I believe that it can become easy to lose sight of the bigger picture when we concentrate on just our own financial and social interests. I catch myself in that trap occasionally. In fact, as an agent of Nevada State Education, a "public official" if you will, it is important that I remain on task with regards to serving all of Nevada's citizens, and not just the ones with whom I agree on social or economic issues. Being a part of the mining community provides me with an outlook and a perspective that I would most likely overlook and dismiss, were I not to have a stake in mining. In other words, in order for me to understand a miner's perspective, I need to walk a mile in a miner's boots, and weigh a troy ounce of miner's hard-earned gold, and I am going to do those things.
     
    Mining has every good reason to make it's arguments for being an important part of American culture, for being an industry that built our country, and for being a legitimate and noble vocation. I understand and recognize the concerns of other stakeholders, and I feel privileged that in America we have the right to stand up in a public forum and make our case for what we believe in. That also includes others whose interests are in opposition to our own. That's what democracy is supposed to be, and I do not advocate for any other type of government, even though democracy has it's flaws and shortcomings.
     
    It appears to me as though the courts are recognizing the importance of mining laws (Thank You Judge Ochoa), and for good reason, but in my opinion, it has to be balanced with the needs of others in our society. Clay offered a link [above] to the CA Water Control Board's "Water Rights Process", in which is included this poignant paragraph, which outlines the challenges that such laws must address:
     
    The difficulty comes in balancing the potential value of a proposed or existing water diversion with the impact it may have on the public trust. After carefully weighing the issues and arriving at a determination, the Board is charged with implementing the action which would protect the latter. The courts also have concurrent jurisdiction in this area. As with all the other pieces of the California water puzzle, allocating the limited resource fairly and impartially among many competing users represents one of the Board’s greatest challenges.
     
    Read it again.
     
    I get to make my choices about where I stand, as do others. Even though I studied Fishery/Wildlife Biology at Utah State and Oregon State, and I understand the issues they argue, I have decided to side with mining. That said, I am of the opinion that we will all be better off if we start listening to one-another, instead of being in a constant state of war (I am a service-connected disabled Vet....I hate war). I would like to see an equitable solution in the Third Appellate, because my intention is to wash gravel this Summer, and I like to see the dredgers back in the water. The mining industry has earned that right. Hell, Gold mining in the American West pretty much paid for the Civil War, which preserved our nation. America owes the mining industry a great debt.
     
    /endRant
  6. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Ronald C in Using Water In A Nearby Creek?   
    After all that, I think I want to borrow another 750 ml of it just after it leaves the Glenlivet distillery.
  7. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Using Water In A Nearby Creek?   
    Thank you Clay,
     
    It's very difficult to receive valid information about mining, especially for a noob like me. The relatively recent legal challenges, and the renewed interest in CA over water as it applies to these interests has, as you put it, created a "cranky monster". Heh.  I have learned that for the most part, the mining community is very tight-lipped (for good reason I surmise), and I am grateful for your response. Fortune favors the bold, so I keep asking questions so I can learn.
     
    Your thoughtful response brings up several points; some of which I have considered, and others I have not (for which I am grateful). I know that CA has the 8th largest economy in the world, and I know that agriculture comprises a large part of that. I grew up near Chico, bucking hay and picking fruit, so I have some understanding of the importance of water to agricultural interests. I have also been reading voraciously for the past year, with great interest, about the current struggles of the mining community with regulatory agencies and other interest groups in CA. So much so, in fact, that I was convinced by the mining community's overwhelming response to the the Rinehart case, to send my eight letters for the case to be published for citation in other federal and state mining rights arguments. My name is on that list. I am delighted that many of these decisions have supported the legal assertions that federal mining rights supercede state "regulation" which have resulted in prohibition. Also, my Father was a Millwright (capitalization intentional). Mining is in my blood. (Parker Schnabel helped me realize how I need mining in my life - that kid is really something!).
     
    No, I do not possess sufficient personal resources to sustain a long legal campaign. Such battles, while important, would certainly place my family in financial difficulties, which is why I joined ICMJ and PLP (special offer), so I could contribute to Mr. Rinehart's defense and learn more about mining. I also donated $100 (10 tickets) to McCracken's (although I am not a New 49'ers member) last nugget raffle fundraiser . I didn't win, but that's okay...for me, it's not about getting the gold, it's about finding the gold. I also need to be in the forest and to shovel gravel in summer... to unwind from my job.
     
    I am a college professor (I know...some may label me "the enemy") but I happen to believe that I can hold these two seemingly contradictory thoughts in my mind: Public management entities have a solemn duty to protect resources for everyone, and mining activity is a fundamental right of American citizens. I do not believe that I must hate one side, in order to love the other. The historical and social context is far too complicated for that stance, in my opinion. The reason we have the judicial system is so we can work out these conflicts when they arise. But just because we disagree on resources use, doesn't mean we need to hate the opposition. They are people just like us, with families and struggles and well-meaning intentions...mostly.
     
    I will figure out a solution to my water needs, and I am grateful for any assistance provided by you folks. I have learned a lot this past year through research. I bought a claim, I sampled it, I am purchasing equipment to extract the minerals, (according to my lovely wife my spending has been out of control....mining is not an inexpensive pursuit*), and I continue to learn more from generous "old timers" like yourself (um..I mean... your experience, not your age
     
    I have made some mistakes, but I am truly enjoying the ride.
     
    Sorry for this long missive; my introduction to the community requires that I divulge my thoughts and intentions to the community...in order to build trust. You are correct sir, my intention is to mine.
    ~
  8. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Using Water In A Nearby Creek?   
    Hi Rod, Thanks for your reply.
     
    Access to my claim is pretty good most of the way, (4x4 required for the last distance), and elevation is 5300' to 5600'. Suffice it to say, I am a seasonal miner...pretty much restricted to Summer, but sometimes I can make it up there on weekends. I look for reasons to go to the claim in the off seasons. It's amazing up there.
     
    Insofar as the current legal questions are concerned, I see mining as a legitimate and historical stakeholder for resources, among many stakeholders and interests, and one that I am willing to defend with more than just words. That said however, I believe that it can become easy to lose sight of the bigger picture when we concentrate on just our own financial and social interests. I catch myself in that trap occasionally. In fact, as an agent of Nevada State Education, a "public official" if you will, it is important that I remain on task with regards to serving all of Nevada's citizens, and not just the ones with whom I agree on social or economic issues. Being a part of the mining community provides me with an outlook and a perspective that I would most likely overlook and dismiss, were I not to have a stake in mining. In other words, in order for me to understand a miner's perspective, I need to walk a mile in a miner's boots, and weigh a troy ounce of miner's hard-earned gold, and I am going to do those things.
     
    Mining has every good reason to make it's arguments for being an important part of American culture, for being an industry that built our country, and for being a legitimate and noble vocation. I understand and recognize the concerns of other stakeholders, and I feel privileged that in America we have the right to stand up in a public forum and make our case for what we believe in. That also includes others whose interests are in opposition to our own. That's what democracy is supposed to be, and I do not advocate for any other type of government, even though democracy has it's flaws and shortcomings.
     
    It appears to me as though the courts are recognizing the importance of mining laws (Thank You Judge Ochoa), and for good reason, but in my opinion, it has to be balanced with the needs of others in our society. Clay offered a link [above] to the CA Water Control Board's "Water Rights Process", in which is included this poignant paragraph, which outlines the challenges that such laws must address:
     
    The difficulty comes in balancing the potential value of a proposed or existing water diversion with the impact it may have on the public trust. After carefully weighing the issues and arriving at a determination, the Board is charged with implementing the action which would protect the latter. The courts also have concurrent jurisdiction in this area. As with all the other pieces of the California water puzzle, allocating the limited resource fairly and impartially among many competing users represents one of the Board’s greatest challenges.
     
    Read it again.
     
    I get to make my choices about where I stand, as do others. Even though I studied Fishery/Wildlife Biology at Utah State and Oregon State, and I understand the issues they argue, I have decided to side with mining. That said, I am of the opinion that we will all be better off if we start listening to one-another, instead of being in a constant state of war (I am a service-connected disabled Vet....I hate war). I would like to see an equitable solution in the Third Appellate, because my intention is to wash gravel this Summer, and I like to see the dredgers back in the water. The mining industry has earned that right. Hell, Gold mining in the American West pretty much paid for the Civil War, which preserved our nation. America owes the mining industry a great debt.
     
    /endRant
  9. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Using Water In A Nearby Creek?   
    Thank you Clay,
     
    It's very difficult to receive valid information about mining, especially for a noob like me. The relatively recent legal challenges, and the renewed interest in CA over water as it applies to these interests has, as you put it, created a "cranky monster". Heh.  I have learned that for the most part, the mining community is very tight-lipped (for good reason I surmise), and I am grateful for your response. Fortune favors the bold, so I keep asking questions so I can learn.
     
    Your thoughtful response brings up several points; some of which I have considered, and others I have not (for which I am grateful). I know that CA has the 8th largest economy in the world, and I know that agriculture comprises a large part of that. I grew up near Chico, bucking hay and picking fruit, so I have some understanding of the importance of water to agricultural interests. I have also been reading voraciously for the past year, with great interest, about the current struggles of the mining community with regulatory agencies and other interest groups in CA. So much so, in fact, that I was convinced by the mining community's overwhelming response to the the Rinehart case, to send my eight letters for the case to be published for citation in other federal and state mining rights arguments. My name is on that list. I am delighted that many of these decisions have supported the legal assertions that federal mining rights supercede state "regulation" which have resulted in prohibition. Also, my Father was a Millwright (capitalization intentional). Mining is in my blood. (Parker Schnabel helped me realize how I need mining in my life - that kid is really something!).
     
    No, I do not possess sufficient personal resources to sustain a long legal campaign. Such battles, while important, would certainly place my family in financial difficulties, which is why I joined ICMJ and PLP (special offer), so I could contribute to Mr. Rinehart's defense and learn more about mining. I also donated $100 (10 tickets) to McCracken's (although I am not a New 49'ers member) last nugget raffle fundraiser . I didn't win, but that's okay...for me, it's not about getting the gold, it's about finding the gold. I also need to be in the forest and to shovel gravel in summer... to unwind from my job.
     
    I am a college professor (I know...some may label me "the enemy") but I happen to believe that I can hold these two seemingly contradictory thoughts in my mind: Public management entities have a solemn duty to protect resources for everyone, and mining activity is a fundamental right of American citizens. I do not believe that I must hate one side, in order to love the other. The historical and social context is far too complicated for that stance, in my opinion. The reason we have the judicial system is so we can work out these conflicts when they arise. But just because we disagree on resources use, doesn't mean we need to hate the opposition. They are people just like us, with families and struggles and well-meaning intentions...mostly.
     
    I will figure out a solution to my water needs, and I am grateful for any assistance provided by you folks. I have learned a lot this past year through research. I bought a claim, I sampled it, I am purchasing equipment to extract the minerals, (according to my lovely wife my spending has been out of control....mining is not an inexpensive pursuit*), and I continue to learn more from generous "old timers" like yourself (um..I mean... your experience, not your age
     
    I have made some mistakes, but I am truly enjoying the ride.
     
    Sorry for this long missive; my introduction to the community requires that I divulge my thoughts and intentions to the community...in order to build trust. You are correct sir, my intention is to mine.
    ~
  10. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Geowizard in Bears On My Claim   
    I am new to the forum.
     
    Bears...some general bromides:
     
     
    -Don't cook meat after dark.
    -Sleep in a camper or trailer. 
    -If you sleep in a tent, keep a flash camera under your pillow. If a bear comes in, take it's photo. The flash will temporarily blind it, and you have time to get away...and you get a bonus photo to accompany your new bear story.
    -DO NOT keep food or toothpaste in your tent. No granola, not trail mix. No food in your tent. Can I say that again?
    -Camp with dogs. 
     
    Black bears...not as dangerous, as was previously mentioned. In the high Sierra, they will mostly avoid you, unless they are very hungry. Be careful in Spring. Nothing as dangerous as a sow with cubs. She will chase you down. Run...or fire warning shot. That works sometimes. (be advised bears can run up to 35 MPH).
     
    Grizzly bears...Carry a sidearm... .45LC or .44mag...or larger. Single action... because you need to think for 1/2 a second before pulling the trigger. A bear's skull is thick, so aim straight down the gullet, or square in the chest. Nothing else will stop them. Shoot to kill if they come at you or stand up on you.
     
    They want food not danger. They will remember your ice chest and your location if they find a food source, especially if you have the ingredients for smores.
     
    Brian
  11. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Prospecting 101   
    Here are a couple of thoughts I had after hearing news of the Butte Nugget:
     
    1.  Look for gold where it has previously been found..mostly.
    2. The old timers may have scoured the hills and found lots of potato-sized nuggets, but they did not have the technology or tools we have today.
    3. Don't assume that large targets are trash.
    4. Keep digging.
    5. Hard work and "sand" are indispensable choices, but don't forget that luck can play a role.
    6. Damn, that guy was lucky!
     
     
    "Most people miss opportunity because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -Thomas Edison (Darnnit, I can't get the signature function to work in my settings, so this will have to do).
  12. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Clay in Prospecting 101   
    Here are a couple of thoughts I had after hearing news of the Butte Nugget:
     
    1.  Look for gold where it has previously been found..mostly.
    2. The old timers may have scoured the hills and found lots of potato-sized nuggets, but they did not have the technology or tools we have today.
    3. Don't assume that large targets are trash.
    4. Keep digging.
    5. Hard work and "sand" are indispensable choices, but don't forget that luck can play a role.
    6. Damn, that guy was lucky!
     
     
    "Most people miss opportunity because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." -Thomas Edison (Darnnit, I can't get the signature function to work in my settings, so this will have to do).
  13. Like
    plumas.placer.miner got a reaction from Geowizard in Bears On My Claim   
    I am new to the forum.
     
    Bears...some general bromides:
     
     
    -Don't cook meat after dark.
    -Sleep in a camper or trailer. 
    -If you sleep in a tent, keep a flash camera under your pillow. If a bear comes in, take it's photo. The flash will temporarily blind it, and you have time to get away...and you get a bonus photo to accompany your new bear story.
    -DO NOT keep food or toothpaste in your tent. No granola, not trail mix. No food in your tent. Can I say that again?
    -Camp with dogs. 
     
    Black bears...not as dangerous, as was previously mentioned. In the high Sierra, they will mostly avoid you, unless they are very hungry. Be careful in Spring. Nothing as dangerous as a sow with cubs. She will chase you down. Run...or fire warning shot. That works sometimes. (be advised bears can run up to 35 MPH).
     
    Grizzly bears...Carry a sidearm... .45LC or .44mag...or larger. Single action... because you need to think for 1/2 a second before pulling the trigger. A bear's skull is thick, so aim straight down the gullet, or square in the chest. Nothing else will stop them. Shoot to kill if they come at you or stand up on you.
     
    They want food not danger. They will remember your ice chest and your location if they find a food source, especially if you have the ingredients for smores.
     
    Brian
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