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Cool photos thanks.  Will you write a little about what personal gear you have found to work well up there? What do your contractor's bring to camp make things more comfortable?

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Geo - Ref. Post #45.

 

I note that you seem to have a preference for Doosan Loaders. I think the discussion about Equipment is very important. Just as a matter of interest, I recently had to renew my Wheeled Loader Ticket ( FEL ) and the chosen Machine in use by the Registered Training Company was a new DL250. Very nice Machine to operate. 

 

I am currently on a Construction Job and one of our main Loaders is a Doosan DL300. This thing is fast and responsive. Bucket capacity is about 3.5 CuYds. We also have a Doosan Excavator on Site. Generally speaking, there seems to be a wide-ranging acceptance of Doosan Equipment on several Jobs I have seen since getting back from Alaska. Notwithstanding the fact that they are of course cheaper than Cat or Komatsu, we still have to consider how we are going to get parts when working in remote areas. Do you know by any chance if Doosan have an Agent / Distributor in Anchorage ?

 

Speaking of Bobcats, we have a wheeled ( Rubber Tires ) Bobcat on Site as well as a Rubber-Tracked Machine. ( Posi-Track ) Interesting to compare the pros and cons of both types of Machines. Seems to me though that the Posi-Track has the upper hand. Goes anywhere and fast. It's a Cat 277B. I happened to be talking to the Posi-Track Operator this morning and he suggested that if he had to spend say $160,000.00 on a 4000 Hour Cat 330DL for example, he would rather have 2 x low-hour DX300's ( Doosan Excavators ) for the same price, rotating each one in and out of service on a week-on / week-off basis. Problem of course would be double Freight on two Machines but imagine the availability ?

 

Just one thing to consider when working in Alaska with these newer Model Machines - lots of Electronics. 

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I like what steve62 is saying.

 

I too believe in operator skill more than OEM electronics.  Admittedly, electronics are improving daily. 

 

I devote a large amount of time carving the river canyons near my home while riding the best motorcycles available.  The trend is towards more electronics as an aid to the operator.  The reality is I've been stranded by electronic malfunctions more than anything else.  The engineers want the machine incapacitated rather than allow a quick-fix on the fly.  An oldtimer like myself, prefers a machine that can limp-in, receive a rudimentary diagnostic session and resume action.

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You don't have the computer control modules that must be shipped in from Italy, Hong Kong nor Seoul.

 

The engineers are constantly upgrading the modules.  There's no reset button,  you replace them.

 

Downtime due to a owner-operator fixable problem is very small when compared to the complete shut-down enabled by OEM on board computers.

 

A small-scale gold miner in a remote location doesn't yearn for fussy equipment,  he wants reliability.

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Oh, you have the tech support and replacement goodies on hand in Ophir.

 

If I were building a freeway thru LA I would prefer the latest and so called greatest machines in the hands of lack-luster operators too.

 

I'll employ the best people and less than desireable equipment in my operation.  We'll keep moving material. 

 

2 schools of thought on this, go with what has been proven or hope the sales pitches from manufacturers are true.

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On the subject of "Waste Management";

 

One of the problems on the American River, in early California mining history was an outbreak of Cholera.

 

Improper disposal of all of the waste products and refuse can certainly lead to unhealthy conditions and sick people.

 

"I am responsible for the health and safety of everyone at the mine."

 

Rule number one at Ophir is that we don't operate a sick mine. Guests and other personnel, contractors are screened before they fly out to the mine to reduce the potential of contagious disease getting to the mine and affecting (infecting) the work force.

 

Maintaining a clean environment involves waste management. One of my first efforts was to declare a "dump site". The dump site is at a location that has access to locals as well as the Ophir mine. It is between two large tailings piles that provide protection from winds and help keep the contents of the dump site contained. The dump site has areas for burnable trash, non burnable trash and recyclable materials. Hazardous materials have a defined area with secondary perimeter. Petroleum, fuels, oils, and similar POL products also have a defined location. All burnable trash is incinerated. I dedicate about 10 percent of my time to stewardship of the environment. That involves picking up trash left by others including past mining related barrels, containers and other relics.

 

Ophir has a functional out-house that uses the "camper potty process". The process uses a bucket - plastic bags and instructions for those that can't figure it out for themselves. The "soiled bags" are contained in 55 gallon barrels and buried in a specified area of the dumpsite when filled. My experience at the Hilltop mine, in Arizona provided background for the actual mine-site "honey-bucket process". It is the same as the out-house camper potty process. When working half a mile underground at the Hilltop mine. if you "had to go", there had to be a process. It's called the mine-site "honey-bucket process". "Business" is conducted as explained above. If anyone needs further explanation, please ask! :)

 

- Geowizard

Geo have you thought about the use of composting toilets for Ophir? Might be a better method than burying "it" in 55 gallon drums and score some points with the green machine.

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I know of two installations of Multrums here in the Hudson Valley. It's just a box the size of an old fasioned telephone booth leaning at at 45 degree angle with a tub at the bottom for liquids. Materials are added at the top and gravity does the rest. The odor problem is handled by adding a electric fan to the chimney/vent to the outside of the building to insure correct air flow. Since the multrum must be vented to the outside. I would guess the loss of house heat would be a show stopper up north since the bacteria needs unfrozen materials to digest so you couldn't just pipe outside air to the box like we can do down here.

 

Incineration is looking better and better.

 

Kurt

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    Hey Geo, would any of those 25 state of Alaska claims that you have advertised in the classified section of the ICMJ under properties, happen to be located on the Innoko river? And before you come back with any disclaimers about advertising on the forum, remember that you are only answering a valid question by an inquiring mind that is curious and wants to know more about all those claims that are available in the Moore Creek Area.----K Rose

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