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No problem with the non disclosure,  manufacturing solutions for commercial solutions are always that way. 

Like to wish you the best with the tube cutting.

 

If you are located in the US. what state are you in ?

 

 

Take Care

 

Salto

Bldr Cnty

Colorado

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A long time ago in a far away galaxy, I was getting into the black powder mountain man thingy. Being right handy with my hands and of a not so sound mind, this included making as much of the equipment and accoutrements possible.

I bring this up because we tend to forget that the old ways worked just fine albeit a bit slow.

Among these was the trick for rifling a barrel. Keyword: rifling bench

Consider that instead of a single tooth cutter, use a router.

Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against CNC. Modern technology is marvelous. Instead, the question is why?

In the amount of time it takes to write the code, a rifling bench could be cobbered together and the pipe routed. Five or ten minutes later another pipe could be mounted in the fixture and routed. Make as many as you like without CNC.

eric

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I cannot imagine how this can easly be built.  

 

With a rifling bench the barrel remains fixed while the cutter attached to a rod about the diameter of the bore turns and rotates as it passes through the barrel matching the rifling roll.

 

Expanding on that as a first thought, one would need the cutter rod to be very strong to support a router to turn the pattern cut into the barrel that is on the rifling roll. Plus the end with the router attached may need addition support to keep it from chattering due to end not being restrained. Plus you have the difficulty of centering the cutter rod.

 

One could have a hollow cutter tube that slides over another solid rod which can be centered at both ends of the barrel.

A router attachment plate would have welded to the leading edge of the cutter tube (like an axle spring perch).

Doing something like this would require the router to be attached to the attachment plate by the top of its  housing.

Then one could get deeper and deeper cuts by adjusting the router depth.

 

First issue is finding a short router that can be used inside the tube to be rifled. It would have to be roughly 4/9 the diameter of the inside of the bore when non extended to permit the increase of the router depth to cut deeper into the tube.  Plus the baseplate of the router would have to be removable so it does not contact the arc of the bore.  

 

Second issue would be cutting the spiral grooves on the rifling roll (which is the helix pattern for the cut), This could be done on a lathe with the capability of cutting very widely spaced threads.

 

To cut multiple leads, one would have to just rotate the barrel a fixed number of degrees, secure it and cut away.

 

Unless I am way off base in this very rough design, this would take some time to build. plus finding the tubes of sufficient thickness to weld on and another tube to slide into it without very much slop that can be well lubricated so it never hangs up.

 

--------------------------------

 

Salto

Bldr Cnty

Colorado

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In planning my reverse helix I thought of laying the pieces out on a flat sheet of plastic [my trommel barrel is all plastic], fastening them down and bending into a cylinder.  Of course that would work only if all the parts were fully flexible/stretchable...which they are not.

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salto_jorge

Within this quote of yours is the answer:

"Expanding on that as a first thought, one would need the cutter rod to be very strong to support a router to turn the pattern cut into the barrel that is on the rifling roll. Plus the end with the router attached may need addition support to keep it from chattering due to end not being restrained. Plus you have the difficulty of centering the cutter rod."

Far end of cutter rod is supported by a wood bearing.

Opposite the cutter itself is a stop that runs against the other side of the barrel as the cutter. Think of it as a counter force.

An analogy is a jack used to jack up your truck. The lip of the jack will never lift the truck unless the opposite end pushes against the ground.

For multiple threads, just re-index the work. Leave the tooling alone.

----------------

We desperately need to bring vocational education back into the schools.

At one time, we assumed that tool use set us apart from the animals. Now our youth is raised without ever understanding or using basic tools. Yet chimpanzees and bonobos make and use tools on a daily basis.

eric

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<Snip> The reverse helix would reduce the amount of water required.  The present sluice box setup is 2 sluices 3 ft x 16 ft. that require 600 gallons per minute. The Reverse Helix would run on about one third of the water.  

 

- Geowizard

Using less water is a reverse helix advantage I haven't really considered.  It puts reverse helix in a better light, especially here in the high desert where we usually have to recycle water.  However, I've assumed that conventional trommel water usage was high not just for the necessary sluice but for effective material washing, again especially here where gold is solidly bound up in clay and very hard dirt clods.

 

Does your estimate of one third the water usage also consider the water needed for thorough material washing? 

 

Last but not least, how's your trommel project coming along?

 

Thanks,

 

Bob

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Geo , I too agree that a raised helix would be more efficient as it will be holding back how ever much concentrate is available before it tumbles over the dam as the helix rises. The recessed area will only be holding what ever its volume will allow as all other concentrate will be sliding past the slot long before the tumble over the dam..

 

dick

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My two cents on reverse helix gold recovery machines..... I've used a reverse helix machine for exploration testing. I found that it worked very well in that application and always thought it would work well in larger applications. We all watched the dramatic failure of the reverse helix "Gold Machine" on Gold Rush. I assumed then and still believe that the failure was due to the manufacturer being pushed too fast to get the machine in production for Gold Rush. Yes the drive was undersized and the manufacturer should have known that when he sized it in the first place. The failure of the seal on the helix was, however, either poor design to begin with, or possibly shoddy workmanship due to being pushed to get the machine out in the field and operating. That seal should most likely have been a solid weld to stand up to the abuse of having sand scrubbing against it day after day. To put it in perspective "reverse helix trommels" are nothing more than a horizontal "Gold Wheel". If the "Gold Wheels" work well for cleaning/separating gold from the lighter sands then the "reverse helix trommels", I would think, should also work equally well. It may be critical what slope and screen sizes are used but I would think that if one dails in their machine for their specific property it should work very well.

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