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Salmon Populations Declines?

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Is mining, in particular dredging, or even over fishing the cause or a big contributing factor of salmon population decline. 


 


 The answer is NO, it's lack of micro-nutrients in the ocean's pastures where the young fry go to grow big and strong so they can come back and spawn another generation of salmon, that is the cause of the decline, that is up until now!!!


 


Check out this project that has sowed those vital nutrients back into the ocean pasture/s where the young salmon go to grow into healthy adults, the result are proof of what is/was the cause of populations declines of salmon.


 


 I wonder what our opponents of dredging is going to use now that this is proven to be the cause and not us dredging?


 


http://pesn.com/2014/06/29/9602512_Worlds-First_Commercial-Scale_Ocean-Pasture-Restoration_a_Phenomenal_Success/


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We live in an area where there are 4 differant types of salmon.Since I have grown up here,I have seen a decline an jump back from each of these salmon.With no dredgeing here during that time.I`m am the only one who has a 4in dredge here an I recently got it a couple years ago.

So I agree,that it is not the dredgers that are makeing a decline,it is natural from somewhere else.Too vast of an ocean to determine what it really is though.Someone would hafto fallow them from fry,to return of the river.

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It is over fishing of the resource the west cost Oregon, Wa, Calif have been shut down for years and the dams , you use to have all five species of salmon migrating all the way to Canada but with Grande Coolie dam in place and no fish ladders that stopped the salmon and steelhead and without those species in place the Dolly Varden is also disappearing they are all interconnected !

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This is a topic that many will decide not to touch, but if you will allow an alternative viewpoint for the sake of discussion...

 

Taken from the perspective of the fishing industry, a profession upon which the answer to this question is as fundamental to the livelihoods of fisherman, as mining is to the livelihoods of miners, any amount of "pressure" upon the system is perceived detrimental to their culture, to their identities, and to their ability to provide for their families. And, not insignificantly, while any one single activity is likely not the cause for the decline in anadromous salmonid populations, the "pressure" from many sides, not matter how miniscule, contributes even if only slightly, to the decline. More importantly, that's how the fishing industry perceives the problem, and as we know from the plight of the mining industry, perception in large part, has a bearing on behaviors and choices. How do we respect the fishing industry's right to the resource while providing for our own rights to the resource? Therein lies the conflict we must attempt to thoughtfully solve.

 

I can understand the desire to seek simple solutions to complex problems, but the answers are never quite as simple as we hope. The truth is usually a combination of factors, in varying degrees, and science finds it very difficult to prove causation, even if correlation is clear. That's why simple arguments of causation appears to pinpoint problems, but ultimately fail to provide comprehensive, long term solutions.

 

The ICMJ's stated position on responsible dredging practices is wise, thoughtful, and is in the best interest of it's own members, and to those with other interests in other organizations. I support it whole-heartedly.

 

"Dredge responsibly.  Continue to follow the 1994 regulations regarding seasonal restrictions to avoid damage to spawning beds and do not dredge into river banks or stream banks.  Do us all a favor and continue to properly collect and discard any trash, lead weights, mercury, etc. you recover while dredging."

 

Personally, I have found that thinking of these types of problems from the perspectives of other's viewpoints allows me to understand these issues on a deeper level, to empathize with other's positions, and to find solutions that are mutualistic, allowing us to move forward without causing distrust or hurt among those with whom wish we need to create respectful relationships. It allows us to propose solutions that are not taken personally by those with whom we disagree, but ultimately must share the resources with because we all have the right, and the responsibility, of respectful stewardship over these public resources for everyone's benefit, fishing and sporting industries included.

 

The logic of this approach, I like to believe, is self-evident. I expect however, that some will vehemently disagree with my argument. That said, I encourage disagreement, in part because I am a Service-connected, Disabled Veteran, and I spent a combination of 10 years in the Marine Corps and the Navy, defending your right to make your argument, and freely state your position, but also because the viewpoints of others are important to us all.

 

I only ask please do it with civility.   :)

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We California dredgers are about to become akin to the phoenix of legend.  We were killed, our annual $25 million industry in CA was ruined and countless peoples dreams of "getting some gold when I can" were destroyed.  WE did nothing to prompt our adversaries actions.

 

There's still an ember of hope glowing from the base of what's left of the carnage.  Finally, our day in court provided a small rendering of justice.  It came down to "what were congress's intentions?"

 

My opinion is clear,  environmentalism is poison to miners.  

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