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Chuck

Wilderness Protocol

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The Wilderness Protocol is a suggestion for Amateur Radio Operators outside of repeater range to monitor or use standard simplex channels at specific times in case of emergencies or other urgent calls. This protocol plan was developed to assist with contacts between Amateur Radio Operators that were traveling in uninhabited areas and outside repeater range.

 

There are three frequencies monitored the primary frequency is 146.520 MHz with 446.00 MHz and 223.5 MHz acting as alternate frequencies. The other frequencies are 6 meter (52.525) and 23cm (1294.50), the most likely protocol frequencies to be heard will be 146.520, 446.00 MHz and 223.5 MHz.

 

There are amateur radio wilderness protocol monitoring times, these can be see along with other protocol info at http://k4jwm.com/wilderness-protocol.htm. Since I have a dual-channel Yaesu FT-8900 I monitor 146.520 100% of the time and use the other channel for making contacts (QSL). When I stop for the night I have Kenwood handheld TH-F6 tri-band dual channel radio that allows me to monitor during the evening hours.

 

The Wilderness Protocol should not be viewed as something just for hikers, off-roads, or prospectors it is available for use by everyone anywhere repeater coverage is unavailable. The protocol only becomes effective when folks put it to use.

 

Cheers, Beers, & Gold

Chuck

KG6SYX

:D

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Don't forget the ham satellites. A hand-held dual bander and an Arrow-type antenna with a printout of the satellite crossing times is all you need.

I like my FT-817 for an all-band portable rig. Low power (5 watts as I recall), but small enough and easy enough on a SLA battery to last for days. Toss in a hank of wire and a small tuner opens up all the HF bands as well. The telescoping whip antenna that came with it is not that good. In the evening, you can still listen to AM broadcasters and shortwave as well. I didn't get the internal rechargeable battery pack.

And in keeping with another thread, another use for solar panels. Communications/evening entertainment while getting the camp duties done.

Oh, and the amateur radio test no longer requires you to know Morse Code. It is all multiple choice questions. Ham radio is the #1 go to for communications in natural disasters. Ham radio is cheap insurance.

eric nl7zw

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I recently got this posting on another prospecting forum and wanted to pass it along so folks thinking about getting their licenses can see it may not be as difficult as it may seem.  

 

 

"Great idea using radios. It would be a good idea if several club members had their amateur licenses. I recently got my technicians. Maybe you or someone else with experience could give a demonstration. If I had known how easy it was to take this first level I would have done it sooner."

Cheers, Beers, & Gold

Chuck

KG6SYX

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Eric

 

I've been thinking about HF Backpack for a while now and I'm considering the FT-817 and a LDR battery powered tuner. What batteries would you recommend for the FT-817? I haven't decided on what antenna to use the Mojave Desert isn't big on trees so wires are pretty much out of the picture. 

 

Chuck, KG6SYX

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Chuck

Sorry about being so slow to respond.

I like SLA (gel cells) for field days. Any time I'm away from the home QTH and in the bush, it's a field day.

For the FT-817, I like a minimum of 12V and 4AH capacity.

If I can, I would take along a small solar panel for keeping the battery on a trickle charge during the day.

Evenings? It is also a general coverage shortwave receiver so I can keep up on the news.

At only 5 watts PEP for a FT-817, a manual tuner is far cheaper and requires no batteries to go dead.

 

2 meters is line of sight, mostly.

However 99 times out of 100, the operative range can far exceed line of site.

In this area of the Copper River Basin (I'm 80-90 miles NE of Valdez), several of us used to meet on 146.52 to rag chew.

None of us are in line of site.

We use mountain bounce off of the Wrangells; Mts Drum, Sanford and Wrangell.

Which one? All, most, just one, I don't know. I can't see the antenna lobes or the mountains.

I know the longest stretch from the mountains to Fish Lake is about 50-55 miles and 30+ from me to the mountains.

 

Line of site is somewhat moot for satellites. BUT, you gotta know the orbital path and its pass time.

I have worked into southern Alberta on 2M-70cm from my driveway using a handheld antenna.

 

Don't overlook the old CB radios for emergency commo. You just gotta know someone with access to a telephone is listening.

And they are dirt cheap at yard sales.

 

eric

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Dipole cut for 80M and usually strung no higher than 8-12 feet. I only use about 20-25 feet of RG-8X for feeding.

I take advantage of NVIS to insure propagation is mostly confined to Alaska.

With a tuner, you can feed it anything from 80M-6M. 160M needs a more capable tuner.

For 2M and 70cm, use an Arrow or home-made clone. There are some clone designs running around using a j-pole feed.

 

NVIS- near vertical incidence signal. Lousy for DX, but great within 200-300 miles or so. Commonly known as a sky burner.

 

I only use the gear when it is an extended trip. 1-3 day trips are radio silent.

eric

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